A thought provoking film in bowling for columbine by michael moore

I was wrong about it.

A thought provoking film in bowling for columbine by michael moore

Film content[ edit ] In Moore's discussions with various people—including South Park co-creator Matt Stonethe National Rifle Association 's then-president Charlton Hestonand musician Marilyn Manson —he seeks to explain why the Columbine massacre occurred and why the United States' violent crime rate especially concerning crimes committed with firearms is substantially higher than those of other nations.

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Bowling[ edit ] The film's title refers to the story that Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold —the two students responsible for the Columbine High School massacre —attended a school bowling class at 6: Later investigations showed that this was based on mistaken recollections, and Glenn Moore of the Golden Police Department concluded that they were absent from school on the day of the attack.

For example, the Michigan Militia use bowling pins for their target practice. When interviewing former classmates of the two boys, Moore notes that the students took a bowling class in place of physical education. He suggests that this might have very little educational value and the girls he interviews generally agree, noting how Harris and Klebold led introverted lifestyles and careless attitudes towards the game, and that nobody thought twice about it.

Moore questions whether the school system is responding to the real needs of students or if they are reinforcing fear. Moore also interviews two young residents of OscodaMichigan.

A thought provoking film in bowling for columbine by michael moore

Moore suggests a culture of fear created by the government and the media leads Americans to arm themselves, to the advantage of gun-making companies. Moore suggests that bowling could have been just as responsible for the attacks on the school as Marilyn Manson, or even President Bill Clintonwho launched bombing attacks on Serbia at the time.

Just before leaving the bank, Moore asks: They say that the bank's policy was to conduct background checks on rifle recipients and mail the rifles to a licensed gun dealer, but Moore's agents, under the pretext of "doing a story on unique businesses across America", convinced bank employees to have his rifle presented to him on camera the morning after filming his account opening.

Further, they counter that contrary to the film's supposition that the bank kept hundreds of guns on their premises, the gun which was handed to Michael Moore in the film was shipped overnight from a vault in a branch miles away.

Moore denied that this sequence was staged but acknowledged the timing of events was compressed for production reasons. He reminded his readers that North Country Bank is a licensed firearms dealer and, in addition to its ATF license number, he produced out-takes where bank employee Jan Jacobson confirms on camera that rifles are secured locally on bank premises.

It is implied that the presence of this facility within the community, and the acceptance of institutionalized violence as a solution to conflict, contributed to the mindset that led to the massacre.

So you don't think our kids say to themselves, 'Dad goes off to the factory every day, he builds missiles of mass destruction. I guess I don't see that specific connection because the missiles that you're talking about were built and designed to defend us from somebody else who would be aggressors against us.

After the release of the film, Lockheed Martin spokesperson Evan McCollum clarified that the plant no longer produces missiles the plant manufactured parts for intercontinental ballistic missiles with a nuclear warhead in the midsbut rockets used for launching satellites: First, note the word "our" in Moore's question.

Moore is not from Colorado -- his question is generic, not meant to refer specifically to the Lockheed Martin plant in question.

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Of course, critics [David Hardy, et al.Political documentary filmmaker Michael Moore explores the circumstances that lead to the Columbine High School massacre, and more importantly, the roots of . Bowling for Columbine is a American documentary film written, produced, directed, and narrated by Michael Moore.

The film explores what Moore suggests are the primary causes for the Columbine High School massacre in and other acts of violence with guns. Critics Consensus: Where to Invade Next finds documentarian Michael Moore approaching progressive politics with renewed -- albeit unabashedly one-sided -- vigor.

Michael Moore interviews people, and when he does that, he uses pathos, logos, facts, ethos to influence the victims. He also uses irony, provoking, humor, and sarcasm when he interviews his interviewee.

Discussion I think Michael Moore has putted a lot of heart in this movie, because it is very thoughtful, because it is such a huge problem.

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